Monday, November 10, 2014

GED Math Factorials, Permutation, Combinations | Videos

I recently helped a student with their GED math, and in particular GED math and factorials.  Until she showed me the section on factorials, I had no idea that concept along with permutations are important to understand.  To be even clearer, it was in the GED Science section of the GED learning video.

example of factorials

The learner was completely confused, and even though she read through and listened to the video, she still had no idea what the difference was between factorials, permutations, and combinations.  She also was baffled as to how they might relate to her in the "real world".

Being the teacher I am, I decided to Google these terms and search for any website that might offer a simple explanation.

exampe of finding combinations

I did find one... and that was Kahn Academy.  All the other websites had examples and explanations, but they were, in my opinion, still too complicated.  I was looking for a simple and easy way to try to break down the difference so that my students, who were preparing for their GED math test, might have a better understanding.

Having found, not one, but several videos on factorials, permutations, and combinations gave me a sense of relief.  I now have a resource for my students.  There are also several samples worked out through videos. 

As a teacher, watching those videos, I now have a better understanding of how to teach the difference.

I would highly suggest that if you are teaching your students these GED math concepts, you go to Kahn Academy and view these videos.

They helped me tremendously.... and I am anxious to meet with my student in a few days to share what I have learned.

You might be thinking... just TELL me... what IS factorials, permutations, and combinations!  In all honesty, I am still learning myself.  What I can tell you is once you view the videos.... perhaps even once or twice..... you will have a great understanding!  I also think that you will then be able to, in simple math language, explain to your learners, not only the difference but also give them examples.

Check out videos on factorials, permutations, and combinations!

Wednesday, October 08, 2014

Finding the Least Common Denominator of Three Fractions

The least common denominator of two or more fractions is the smallest number that can be divided evenly by each of the fractions' denominators.  You can determine the LCM (least common multiple)  by finding multiples of the denominators of the fractions.

Find the least common denominator of the following fractions:  5/12, 7/36, and 3/8.

8, 16, 24, 36
12, 24, 36

The least common denominator is 36.